Glossary

Trans Rights are Human Rights
Let’s be crystal clear: trans women are women, trans men are men, non-binary people are human beings, and all trans people and their identities are beautiful and valid. We support you!

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Androgyne

Person who is simultaneously male and female or in between male and female

Androgyne offset rainbow

The flag

The androgyne flag was designed in 2014 by Tumblr user saveferris. Pink represents femininity; blue, masculinity; and purple, androgyny.

The term

Androgyne is a non-binary identity. For many, it is a very fluid experience. Some experience androgyny on a spectrum leaning either female (femandrogyne) or male (mascandrogyne). Some identify equally with male and female (neutrandrogyne) and others have a flexible and fluid experience (versandrogyne and fluandrogyne). Androgyne is not the same thing as androgynous, as androgynous is an external representation and not an actual gender.

Genderqueer

Person who does not subscribe to conventional gender distinctions

Genderqueer offset rainbow

The flag

The genderqueer flag was designed in 2011. Lavender (a mix of blue and pink) represents the binary genders; white, individuals outside of the gender binary; and chartreuse green (the inverse of lavender), those outside of the binary.

The term

The term genderqueer emerged in the 1990s in the United States as an umbrella term for a number of non-binary identities. Generally, a person who is genderqueer has a queer or non-normative experience with gender. This experience is not limited to gender identity but can extend to all experiences with gender, such as gender expression.

Some people who identify as genderqueer also identify as trans and/or non-binary while others do not. Some might choose to physically transition in some way and others might not. You might hear the term gender non-conforming used instead of or in addition to genderqueer. Some use the term genderqueer interchangeably with non-binary, though not all identity with both.

Intersex

Person born with variation in physical sex characteristics that do not fit binary gender

Intersex offset rainbow

The flag

The intersex flag was designed in 2013 by Morgan Carpenter. Yellow and purple were chosen as alternatives to blue and pink. The purple circle stands for wholeness, emphasizing that intersex people are complete human beings who can be whoever they want to be.

The term

Intersex is not a gender or sexual identity but how a person is born. Intersex people are born with physical sex characteristics that are not strictly “male” or “female” that might be expressed in a person’s hormones, chromosomes, genitalia, and so forth. Some people are identified by medical professionals as intersex at birth because their variation was physically noticeable, while others find out later. Intersex people can have any gender identity, gender modality, and sexual identity.

For many intersex people, the adults in their lives decide to raise them on the gender binary as either girls or boys. Medical professionals may also suggest surgery to “assign” the intersex person a gender, making it seem essential to the mental health of the child. This is nonconsensual and can be very traumatic for intersex people as they come into their own identities.

Non-binary

Person whose gender does not fall into the strict idea of binary genders

Non-binary offset rainbow

The flag

The non-binary flag was designed in 2014. Yellow represents being outside the binary; white, the presence of all colors; purple, fluidity and the multitude of gender experiences; and black, the absence of gender.

The term

Non-binary, often called enby, is a gender identity for people who do not identify with the strict gender binary that much of the world recognizes today. Non-binary people might identify anywhere on a gender spectrum or not identify with gender at all. Some use the term non-binary interchangeably with genderqueer, though not all identify with both.

Non-binary people (and many other people who do not identify on the gender binary) might use gender-neutral pronouns, neo-pronouns, a mix of gendered and gender-neutral pronouns, or something else. Please respect people's pronouns!

Non-binary Trans

Person who identifies as both transgender & non-binary

Non-binary trans offset rainbow

The flag

The non-binary trans flag was designed in 2014. Blue and pink represent the typical colors used for baby boys and baby girls; yellow, being outside the binary; white, both the presence of all colors and people who are intersex, transitioning, or have not defined their gender identity; purple, fluidity and the multitude of gender experiences; and black, the absence of gender.

The term

The non-binary trans identity emerged as a combination of non-binary and transgender to better represent people who identify as both. Not all transgender people identify as non-binary, and not all non-binary people identify as transgender.

Progress Pride

Evolution of the traditional pride flag to highlight queer & trans BIPOC

Progress Pride offset rainbow

The flag

The progress pride flag was designed in 2018 by Daniel Quasar to be more inclusive and to represent forward progress. The black and brown stripes represent marginalized queer communities of color as well as those living or who lived with AIDS. The blue, pink, and white stripes mirror the transgender flag and are incorporated to represent the transgender community. The six stripes from the traditional pride flag also have meanings: red represents life; orange, healing; yellow, sunlight; green, nature; blue, harmony; and violet, spirit.

"We need to always keep progress moving forward in all aspects of our community." - Daniel Quasar

💖 Thank you to all the incredible Trans Women of Color who fought for so many of the rights and privileges we enjoy today!

Transfeminine

Person generally assigned male at birth (AMAB) who identifies as a feminine gender

Transfeminine offset rainbow

The flag

The transfeminine flag was designed around 2015. There is no published meaning of the colors of the transfeminine flag, but starting with blue on the edges and transforming into pink might represent the transition process from male to female.

The term

A transfeminine person, or trans fem, is typically a transgender person assigned male at birth (AMAB) who identifies fully or partially with a feminine gender. Transfeminine people may have transitioned physically, whether fully or partially, to their feminine identity through gender-affirming procedures and treatments, but not all do so for a variety of reasons. Transfeminine people may also express their gender identity through their outward appearance, their name, and so forth.

You might hear transfeminine referred to as M2F or MtF (male to female), and some trans people identify with these terms. These terms are not always accurate, however, as it implies a physical transition, so it is important to communicate with the person as is appropriate for your relationship.

Transgender

Person who does not identify with the gender assigned to them at birth

Transgender offset rainbow

The flag

The transgender flag was designed in 1999 by Monica Helms and debuted at the Phoenix, Arizona pride parade in 2000. Light pink is the color traditionally used for baby girls and light blue, the color traditionally used for baby boys. White represents people who are non-binary, transitioning, and intersex.

The term

Often referred to as trans, transgender refers to people who do not identify as the gender assigned to them at birth. While many people think that transgender is a gender identity, it is actually a gender modality.

Gender modality essentially means that the gender assigned to a person at birth and their actual gender or gender presentation are not the same. Cisgender is also a gender modality, indicating that a person's actual gender is the gender assigned to them at birth.

Avoid using the term transsexual when referring to transgender people. The concern is not with the term itself but with its implication: the term transsexual assumes a physical medical transition, which not all transgender people choose, or are able, to complete.

Transmasculine

Person generally assigned female at birth (AFAB) who identifies as a masculine gender

Transmasculine offset rainbow

The flag

The transmasculine flag was designed around 2015. There is no published meaning of the colors of the transmasculine flag, but starting with pink on the edges and transforming into blue might represent the transition process from female to male.

The term

A transmasculine person, or trans masc, is typically a transgender person assigned female at birth (AFAB) who identifies fully or partially with a masculine gender. Transmasculine people may have transitioned physically, whether fully or partially, to their masculine identity through gender-affirming procedures and treatments, but not all do so for a variety of reasons. Transmasculine people may also express their gender identity through their outward appearance, their name, and so forth.

You might hear transmasculine referred to as F2M or FtM (female to male), and some trans people identify with these terms. These terms are not always accurate, however, as it implies a physical transition, so it is important to communicate with the person as is appropriate for your relationship.

Transneutral

Transgender person who identifies fully or partially with a neutral gender

Transneutral offset rainbow

The flag

The transneutral flag was designed in 2018 by Tumblr user arco-pluris. It uses the pink and blue from the transgender flag, as well as shades of yellow to represent non-binary and neutral identities.

The term

Transneutral refers to transgender people who transition from the gender assigned to them at birth to a neutral gender. People whose gender is transneutral might also identify with non-binary, maverique, genderfluid, agender, and many other genders. Transneutral people may have medically transitioned from the gender assigned to them at birth but not fully toward another binary gender.

Similar to M2F/MtF and F2M/FtM for transfeminine and transmasculine people, transneutral people might identify with the terms M2N/MtN or F2N/FtN (male or female to neutral). Not all transneutral people identify with these terms because they assume a medical transition.